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BROCHURE RACK

Ospreys are back in the UK

20/03/2013 08:50:57
birds/2012/osprey_03_97_rspb

(03)97 back in Rutland in the snow - Is he regretting his early arrival? Photo courtesy of Rutland Osprey Project

Ospreys spotted at Rutland and Glaslyn
March 2013. A sure sign of spring (ignoring the weather) is when ospreys return to the UK after their winter break in the warmer climes of West Africa. The first ospreys have foolishly returned a few days earlier than last year, to be greeted by rain, fog and even snow.


Rutland
Rutland's most successful breeding osprey, ever, (03)97, was the first back on Sunday 18th March, ensuring that he had no competition for his usual nest site. He was followed shortly afterwards by (00)09, his daughter, who fledged in 2009 (The clue is in the name).

21st March update - Unringed female arrives at Manton Bay nest on Rutland Water; those in the know have identified her as the female who has nested on that nest for the last 4 years.

To get the latest updates, go to the Rutland osprey website

Read more about Rutland Water Nature Reserve 

Glaslyn
The Glaslyn ospreys have often been the pace setters, first return, first eggs etc, but this year they were pipped at the post by Rutland. The first bird, and unringed female, arrived back on Monday 19th March, and by 24th March, a pair had taken up residence.

Read more about the Glaslyn Osprey Project 

More reports of ospreys

  •  Osprey sighted at Top Hill Low reserve in Yorkshire. 21st March
  •  Osprey spotted at Loch Dougan, Gelston near Castle Douglas. 21st March  
  • Resident Loch of the Lowes osprey returned on 24th March

reviews/2012/rutland_ospreys

Rutland Water Ospreys

This is the story about the project, a joint effort between Anglian Water and the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust, how it was hatched, who was involved, the setbacks and the huge successes.


Read full review »

 

Read the comments about this article and leave your own comment

Great Britain Cleaning Up The Waterways Paid Off

The campaign Great Britain had to clean up its waterways, has definitely paid off. Salmon have returned to the Thames River, and the otter population has increased. But also for raptors that prey on fish, such as the osprey. Having the osprey and the white-tailed eagles, shows the raptor diversity that Great Britain is achieving.

Posted by: Tim Upham | 24 Mar 2013 17:54:02

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