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Wildife and Bird Watching in Cornwall

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Cornwall, including the Scilly Isles, is one of the finest counties for wildlife watching in the UK. A top spot for migrant and unusual birds such as the Balearic Shearwater and Choughs, it is also one of the best for marine wildlife too.

Basking sharks are inrceasingly common, especially between May and October, and bottlenose and Risso's dolphins are often seen, as well as a few Minke whales. Cornwall has more strandings than any other county, and is also prone to 'exotic' finds that have blown across the Atlantic.

 

These maps are intended as a guideline only; you must check the exact location of the reserve yourself. Wildlife Extra assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or usefulness of the information on this website.

Basking shark sighting and a code of conduct

With the recent surge in basking shark sightings off the UK coast, especially Cornwall and the Isle of Man, the Marine Conservation Society has devised a code of conduct as to how to behave when near the sharks, whether in a boat or swimming (not advised). More.
reviews/reviews_2010/seashore_safaris

Seashore safaris

Best activity book of the year 
Summer is here, we have warm weather, and the beach is beckoning. A swim, build a couple of sandcastles, a bit of beach cricket, but what to do next?

Click rockpooling to read more 

reviews/reviews_2010/book_of_shells

The Book of Shells

We've all picked up a shell or two on the beach, but outside the very most common ones, we have no idea what we are handling. The glorious 652 page book will be able to answer that question for you, no matter where in the world you are. 
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reviews/reviews_2010/great_british_marine_animals

Great British Marine Animals - 3rd Edition

Many people think of the waters around Great Britain as cold, grey and fairly lifeless. This book will put you right (though noone can argue about the water temperature).
Read full review »