Sign up for our Free email Newsletter
and get all the latest wildlife news!
Choose:
Wild Travel Magazine
BROCHURE RACK Royale Wilderness Archant app Wild Travel Magazine Subs - Digital Subs Small MPU (left)
View location on map

Titchwell Marsh RSPB

uk/Titchwell_Marsh_rspb

 Situated on the stunning north Norfolk coast, Titchwell Marsh is one of the RSPB's most visited reserves. It has something for everyone, from beginners to seasoned birdwatchers on the lookout for a rarity. 

Titchwell Marsh was first claimed from the sea for farming and agriculture. Sea walls were built and the whole area of the current reserve was taken out of the surrounding saltmarsh, enclosed and used as arable farmland and grazing marsh. During the Second World War, part of the area was also used by the military as a tank range.

After the floods of 1953, the sea walls were not rebuilt and the area went back to saltmarsh. It was left like that for 20 years.

The RSPB bought the site in 1973, building walls to protect 56ha from the sea. In the 1990s, an area of dunes in front of the reserve was eroded by the sea, and formed a creek and the current tidal marsh.

Highlights: Titchwell Marsh is one of the RSPB's most visited reserves, where people can take a walk from the visitor centre down to the sandy beach, past reedbeds and shallow lagoons full of birds. In summer, marsh harriers float over the reeds, which are home to bitterns and bearded tits. On the lagoons are avocets, gulls and terns. In autumn and winter, the reserve plays host to 20 species of wading birds and to large numbers of ducks and geese. 

Opening times
The reserve is always open. The centre is open from 9.30 am-5 pm (9.30 am-4 pm from mid-November to mid-February).

There is a small parking charge for non members.

Grid reference:TF750443

Click here for more details.

These maps are intended as a guideline only; you must check the exact location of the reserve yourself. Wildlife Extra assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or usefulness of the information on this website.

 
 

Read the comments about this article and leave your own comment

To post a comment you must be logged in.
CLICK HERE TO LOG IN AND POST A COMMENT